Critics say state Republicans wasting time on creationism, Islam and 'birthers'

Sunday, March 13, 2011 at 11:05pm

At the top of the agenda for Tennessee’s new Republican majority is proving that the party is capable of governing responsibly. But roughly midway through their first legislative session in power, GOP leaders are being forced to answer critics who say they’re wasting time on pointless arguments and politically extreme causes. 

Whether it’s trying to nullify federal health care reform or criminalizing some practices of Islam, Republicans are drawing outrage from the news media and mockery from the social network. 

In a frequently bizarre debate recalling Tennessee’s own Scopes Monkey Trial of 1925, a bill brought by creationists has dominated the time of the House education subcommittee. The argument has touched on topics including the number of chromosomes in chimpanzees, the Big Bang Theory and the odds that Elvis is alive.

Also among the measures drawing scorn:

Sen. Bill Ketron, R-Murfreesboro, is calling for Tennessee to study establishing a monetary system of its own to be ready “in the event of hyperinflation, depression, or other economic calamity related to the breakdown of the Federal Reserve System, for which the state is not prepared …”

Sen. Stacey Campfield, R-Knoxville, thinks it’s a good idea to set up a committee of legislators to pick and choose which federal laws are constitutional and presumably therefore OK to follow. 

In a bill spawned by the Obama “birther” conspiracy theory, Senate Judiciary Committee chair Mae Beavers, R-Mt. Juliet, wants to force candidates on Tennessee’s ballot to prove U.S. citizenship by producing their birth certificates.

“Such distractions should anger Tennesseans who look to elected representatives for leadership, fresh ideas, responsible behavior and efforts to help responsibly guide the state, promote economic development and create a better-educated workforce,” The Jackson Sun wrote in a stinging editorial listing many of the legislature’s more unusual proposals. 

Ketron, also sponsor of the bill against Shariah law, has been singled out for special abuse on Twitter from wisecracking state political observers. 

“Sen. Ketron to propose legislation stating that Tennessee courts must apply Miller Lite’s ‘Man Law’ to all disputes,” the liberal blogger Ilissa Gold wrote in a representative tweet. 

Ketron maintains his bill would give the state the authority to go after Muslim terrorists. But even his hometown newspaper, the Daily News Journal, ridicules that claim. The state doesn’t need or want that power, the newspaper said in an editorial, adding that the legislation is worded so broadly that it could cause problems for “anyone who practices a core set of principles such as praying toward Mecca five times a day, abstaining from alcohol, fasting during Ramadan or following Shariah rules for finance.”

In its own editorial, the Knoxville News Sentinel said Ketron’s proposal “would basically outlaw Islam” and called it “obviously unconstitutional and an embarrassment to the entire state.”

Critics say many of these around-the-bend bills are coming from far-right organizations and are put forth by grandstanding lawmakers without much thought. Beavers’ “birther” proposal seems to be one such bill. It requires candidates to produce a “long-form birth certificate.” During an appearance on the Internet’s Reality Check Radio, Beavers conceded she didn’t even know what that was.

“Now, you’re asking me to get into a lot of things that I haven’t really looked into yet,” the senator told the show’s host when he asked about that.

As for President Obama, Beavers said: “I have no personal knowledge about whether or not he was eligible [to run for president] or not, but there have been a lot of questions about it, and I think it just begs the question, you know, who’s really checking on this?”

A bill by Rep. Bill Dunn, R-Knoxville, requires public schools to “create an environment” in which teachers “respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about controversial issues,” including evolution. It also orders administrators to “assist teachers to find effective ways to present the science curriculum as it addresses scientific controversies.”

Dunn insists he aims only to promote “critical thinking” in schools about the origins of life. But opponents say the bill is clearly intended to open the door to teaching intelligent design in public schools, and creationists admit they support the proposal. David Fowler, of the Rev. James Dobson’s Family Action Council, touted the bill in an opinion piece in the online publication, The Chattanoogan.

“Certainly intelligent design theory is not without its critics, and if the subject is going to be taught, then discussion of those criticisms is appropriate,” Fowler wrote. “But it is also appropriate that students understand that intelligent design is a theory that many scientists are beginning to consider and hold because of the weaknesses in the scientific evidence supporting evolution.” 

Wesley Roberts, a Hume-Fogg High School science teacher, testified against the bill during one day’s hearings. He said it invites “ghost stories” into the classroom.

“I cannot imagine a student demanding by legislative authority that we include faith healing in a discussion of vaccinations,” he said. “It takes us backward. Science is not a democratic process in which anyone’s opinion, no matter how non-scientifically based, counts. It’s a process that deals only with reason, logic and proof.”

Dunn, whose bill still is pending in the House subcommittee, dismisses such concerns. He said he was acting in part because a child came to him and questioned why humans and chimpanzees don’t have the same number of chromosomes if they come from common ancestors. 

Dunn insisted his bill wouldn’t lead to the teaching of intelligent design but would foster a more wide-ranging and open discussion of how life began. Louisiana enacted the same proposal in 2008, and there have been no reports of the teaching of creationism there, he said.

“There are things that are possible, and maybe that’s what’s alarming you,” he told his critics during one subcommittee meeting. “There are things that are probable. It is possible that Elvis Presley is alive. It’s not very probable.”

Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey blames criticism of the legislature on the news media, which he says focuses on the weird and controversial. 

“You all ask me about things I haven’t even heard of until you all walk into this room, and that’s what you all report on,” Ramsey told reporters during his weekly availability.

Ramsey defended lawmakers’ right to sponsor whatever bills they see fit and insisted Republican leaders are concentrating on improving the economy. 

“Every senator has that right, and I’ll defend that to my dying day. … It’s only a distraction if the press focuses on it. And I mean that. It has not distracted me for one minute, not one minute. I’m focused like a laser beam on job creation and education. That has not distracted me for one second. Never thought about it until y’all walked in this room this morning. So how could it be a distraction if I haven’t even thought about it?”   

54 Comments on this post:

By: GuardianDevil01 on 3/14/11 at 4:13

Who is surprised by this? It has been going on since the 1980s when Religiosos took over the Republican party. They talk a lot about reducing taxes, spending, and the role of government but once elected they quickly forget these promises. This leaves only putative "social conservatism" as a means of differentiating themselves from statist liberals. When given the choice of defending the Constitution or pushing their warped religious beliefs via government force they will always do the latter.

By: spooky24 on 3/14/11 at 5:59

The point of this article alludes me Perhaps, the slogan directly from the White House might help. "Elections have consequences" The voters in Tennessee clearly want the Republicans in charge in both state houses as well as the Governors office. My advise would be to get over it.
What is striking about this article is the inability of the writers on the staff of The City Paper to understand basic grammar and penmanship. By my count this is the eleventh time I have pointed out to this writer that a sentence can't be started with the word 'but'

An example:

But roughly midway through their first legislative session in power, GOP leaders are being forced to answer critics who say they’re wasting time on pointless arguments and politically extreme causes.

Should be:

Midway through their first empowered legislative session, the GOP leaders are facing critics, who contend that they’re wasting time on pointless arguments, along with politically extreme causes.

Is it really that difficult to check your own work? No one is expecting George Will type text. However, these errors are at the sixth grade level.

sp

By: BEOWULF on 3/14/11 at 6:04

BEOWULF: "Whether it’s trying to nullify federal health care reform or criminalizing some practices of Islam, Republicans are drawing outrage from the news media and mockery from the social network."

The two issues in this quote should be of major concern to traditional, patriotic Americans: 1] obamacare is not constitutional. 2] some aspects of Sharia law, if practiced by the average American, would result in their imprisonment!

"...outrage from the news media and mockery from the social network." - self explanatory: LEFTWING SOCIALISTS.

By: vibinc on 3/14/11 at 6:13

While these bills are headline catching, there are plenty of others that are far more damaging to the state that are slipping through the cracks.

What's more, Ramsey says he's focused like a laser beam on job creation and education.

Really? I thought that wasn't the role of government Mr. Lt. Gov.

http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2011/03/01/haslam-harwell-ramsey-norris-nfib-jobs.html

Next thing you know they'll try to outlaw accountability, since that's another thing they can't stand.

By: Moonglow1 on 3/14/11 at 6:17

Moonglow1: did this group of Republicans actually graduate from high school? Are they literate? Perhaps a recall is in order. Do we really want fanatics like these representing us? My tax money is paying for this lunacy.

By: treehugger7 on 3/14/11 at 6:32

Relax--it'll only be for two years..Would that we could recall! I feel sure we are the laughingstock of the country by now. If they didn't say stupid stuff, they would have nothing to say. It would be funny if they weren't directly affecting what happens in TN. I am certain the GOP legislature will only last two years. The damage to Tennesseans and our reputation will last much longer....

By: treehugger7 on 3/14/11 at 6:35

Actually, we probably ought to require them to show their diplomas and post them online so we can be sure where they were educated...and born in the US!.

By: EDUNITED on 3/14/11 at 6:44

Rather than making a hash of the economy in the name of "improvements," at least the Tennessee Legislature is "doing no harm." Frankly, the Legislature should meet only every two years and have 1/3 of the budget. That is the only way it would focus on substance.
Look at the Democrat achievements:
Education: the system is a failure, and continues to fail to educate children despite spending more and more funds. TennCare is an immoral failure. As a Bredesen Commissioner told me when McWherter created TennCare: "Great idea, give away a valuable good for nothing and require no participation of the recipients. That will work." Unfortunately, neither party wants to restructure these worthless behemoths.
I won't use the word refrom becasue, as we saw from the Reid-Pelosi US Congress that means spend trillions on programs bound to fail.

Ed vanVoorhees
www.EvVMgt.com

By: Antisocialite on 3/14/11 at 7:08

spooky24 said:
The point of this article alludes me Perhaps, the slogan directly from the White House might help. "Elections have consequences" The voters in Tennessee clearly want the Republicans in charge in both state houses as well as the Governors office. My advise would be to get over it.
What is striking about this article is the inability of the writers on the staff of The City Paper to understand basic grammar and penmanship. By my count this is the eleventh time I have pointed out to this writer that a sentence can't be started with the word 'but'

Is there anything more hilarious than a person condescendingly lecturing a writer and editor on grammar mistakes while simultaneously having two glaring mistakes in their own comment?

Just for the record spooky24:

allude - suggest or call attention to indirectly; hint at

elude - evade or escape from (a danger, enemy, or pursuer), typically in a skillful or cunning way

advise - VERB to give counsel to; offer an opinion or suggestion as worth following

advice - NOUN an opinion or recommendation offered as a guide to action, conduct, etc.

By: revo-lou on 3/14/11 at 7:33

It would seem that spooky is more akin to the Bowery Boys than the repubs.

By: SargeE5 on 3/14/11 at 7:45

I think perhaps, the time has come for the media and this includes the City Paper to realize that Tennessee now has legislators who are actually responding to the will of the people. They are not shoving ridiculous laws down the throats of the tax payers. This is something that couldn't be said when democrats were in control. It obviously irks the liberals to no end, that there are reasonable doubts to Obama's actual birthplace. It also seems to frighten Progressives that in the course of Science in school classrooms, that intelligent design may be discussed, and God forbid (no pun intended) that the term "Creator" may actually be brought to light.
The existence of God, and the belief in our Savior Jesus Christ scares liberals to death. If they don't believe there is God, then why the adverse reaction? The influx of Islam should scare them to the quick, but it doesn't, and again we wonder why. Perhaps it's the democrat denial, or the conviction that comes from Christ that makes them shy away.
Sincerely,
"The Watchman"

By: lstephen on 3/14/11 at 7:52

Maybe Ketron;s currency bill should be amended so that it just brings back Confederate money. At least we would know that 10 other states accepted that at one time.

Goofy! And that's the nicest thing I can say.

By: Kosh III on 3/14/11 at 8:17

" I’m focused like a laser beam on job creation and education. "

Ramsey is such a blatant LIAR.

Go here
http://wapp.capitol.tn.gov/apps/sponsorlist/default.aspx?id=S020&ga=107

and you see all the bills he has sponsored or co-sponsored.
NONE are related to job creation, only one is marginally related to education.

By: Moonglow1 on 3/14/11 at 8:18

Moonglow1The TN Republicans were purchased by the Koch brothers as is the Tea Party thereby these. Crazies DO NOT represent the will of the people in TN. As far ass failure of education in TN ...is it really a failure when the wealthy send their children to Harpeth Hall & other very expensive schools leaving the poorest students in public schools thus skewing the statistics. And yes I want to see the diplomas & birth records of Beavers & the other nuts.

By: gdiafante on 3/14/11 at 8:23

"The existence of God, and the belief in our Savior Jesus Christ scares liberals to death."

My feelings are best illustrated in a bumper sticker I saw recently..."God, save us from your followers"

By: frodo on 3/14/11 at 8:31

Jeff Woods is becoming quite the activist journalist. He sets up this premise that most of what the Republicans are focusing on is stupid (which it is not), and he offers as sources of this claim other newspapers, one blogger and a science teacher. I'll give him credit for using one credible source...a science teacher who comments on one of the many issues touched on in this story...even if the quote he used was in itself kind of stupid. But really! Using other newspapers as the main source of the premise?! Now I suppose those newspapers will use this article to support their claims that the Republicans are hapless dimwits. Sorry, Jeff. This is not responsible journalism. And now that you so clearly show your bias, I will view your other attempts at journalism as suspect....and shame on your editor, too.

By: gdiafante on 3/14/11 at 8:44

Yeah...unless you force-feed frodo his view, it's not responsible journalism.

Fox news is on...chop chop

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 9:06

Jeff Woods tells it like it is. This is a well-written, timely and thought-provoking article.

"Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey blames criticism of the legislature on the news media, which he says focuses on the weird and controversial." You gotta wonder if Speaker Ramsey was serious or being facetious. Investigating and reporting on the "weird and controversial" is part of the mission statement of all free and uncontrolled news media - that's their job, Ron.

By: budlight on 3/14/11 at 9:19

gdiafante on 3/14/11 at 9:23
"The existence of God, and the belief in our Savior Jesus Christ scares liberals to death."

My feelings are best illustrated in a bumper sticker I saw recently..."God, save us from your followers"

And who will save you from you-seff, G? You don't have to follow God; it's not mandatory. Just as optional as brushing your teeth. Both will benefit you in the long run. God is loving, kind and merciful. He will give you strength and hope.

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 9:26

Again, from the main article:

Wesley Roberts, a Hume-Fogg High School science teacher, testified against the bill during one day’s hearings. He said it invites “ghost stories” into the classroom.

“I cannot imagine a student demanding by legislative authority that we include faith healing in a discussion of vaccinations,” he said. “It takes us backward. Science is not a democratic process in which anyone’s opinion, no matter how non-scientifically based, counts. It’s a process that deals only with reason, logic and proof.”

Wesley Roberts ought to run for office. A large dose of "reason, logic and proof" needs to be injected into the office-holders now seated in the TN statehouse. The elected office-holders in Washington, DC could also use a large dose of "reason, logic and proof".

A shot of reason, logic and proof is the perfect antidote for creeping theocracy, political grandstanding and counter-productive governance.

Mr. Roberts is on to something here. Bravo, Mr. Roberts!

By: revo-lou on 3/14/11 at 9:27

{By: budlight on 3/14/11 at 10:19
God is loving, kind and merciful. He will give you strength and hope.}

The people in Japan and New Zealand may disagree with you.

Why can you not find the strength and hope within yourself, instead of an external source?

By: budlight on 3/14/11 at 9:36

I doubt if anyone blames God for a natural disaster.

The strength and hope is within me - it is God's strength and hope flowing into my heart and throughout my body, mind and soul.

"Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.
Philippians 4:6-7"

By: budlight on 3/14/11 at 9:37

There are instances in disaster where people actually are saved by the hand of God. I'm sure He saved many.

By: iTiSi on 3/14/11 at 9:41

I know one thing. They had better be spending some time on illegal immigrants, as they promised last year, or some more will be out of office in 2012. STOP THE PUSSYFOOTING AROUND! Several other states are already ahead of TN in actually doing something, and when it goes into effect, those illegals will be going to other states, INCLUDING TN. DO SOMETHING AND DO IT NOW, OR ELSE !!!

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 9:41

Big Brother is loving, kind and merciful....He will give you strength and hope....to paraphrase a little from the novel, "1984", by George Orwell.

Many wonder, where was the God of Abraham, when the Nazis were rounding up and gassing the Jews? What was the Divine purpose of the Holocaust?

Some still argue the question: Are natural disasters actually forms of Divinely-willed punishment for sin? Can altering human behavior mitigate and/or exacerbate the supernatural retribution process?

Finally, is Elvis alive and well, living above a gay piano bar, in Nashville, TN?

By: revo-lou on 3/14/11 at 9:42

Why would you NOT blame your god for a natural disaster? I mean, in your world, he created it all, didn't he? It would seem that your god could save a hell of a lot more if the disaster didn't happen at all, no? Oh, wait, I forgot there is that whole apple thing. Never mind.

By: budlight on 3/14/11 at 9:50

I just have faith. No big answers. Just plain and loving faith.

By: Antisocialite on 3/14/11 at 9:57

revo-lou said:
Why can you not find the strength and hope within yourself, instead of an external source?

This is just a guess, but here goes:

Because from an early age budlight has been indoctrinated (probably weekly) to believe in a magical invisible man in the sky. He/She enjoys the sense of purpose and the relief of 'knowing' that there is an afterlife. He/She relies on the confirmation bias delivered multiple times daily by his/her friends and family, which after a lifetime of exposure steels even brilliant minds to the illogicality of the entire myth. It's doubtful that budlight has ever seriously questioned his/her faith objectively, but even if he/she has it's very likely that he/she was given the standard apologetics, which have not advanced for many centuries, even as modern science has dashed biblical claim after biblical claim.

Of course, this entire post will be written off as me 'hating God' or 'bashing the religious' or some other poor excuse, because that seems to be the only way in which many religious people can fathom anyone not believing in a deity. I assure you though, while I urge my religious brothers and sisters in humanity to take a long look at their beliefs, I am only hostile towards them when they attempt to push their religion onto me. In other words, 'I won't tell you what a crock I think your religion is until you start trying to use it to take away mine, or anyone else's rights under the law.'

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 9:59

Philippians 4:6-7? Budlight has Phillipped her lid....she schleps the words of Saul of Tarsus, into the discussion.

Saul was a Jewish Roman citizen who became "Saint Paul", after he fell off his horse, while in the process of "persecuting" the followers of Christ's brand of heretical Judaism. The head injury, caused by his fall from his horse, radically changed Saul's personality and the rest, as they say, is history.

By: revo-lou on 3/14/11 at 10:04

Maybe “Anti”, maybe. I think that it may be simpler than that, in that if they have “faith” they don’t HAVE to think about it, problem solved. Anything that would make them question “why would god do that” is written off as the “will of god” and something that one just cannot understand. To keep from going of the deep end in cases such as that, it is just easier to say, “I know that god loves me, and the world, so all will be okay.”

God/religion is the best drug there is. But I don’t do drugs, of any kind.

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 10:08

Antisocialite, you might enjoy exploring the tenuous tenets and heretical dogma of the Church of the Subgenious.....I have enjoyed numerous "X-Days" with them, at Brushwood Folklore Center, in Sherman, NY. Here's their link:

http://www.subgenius.com/

Praise Bob!

By: Moonglow1 on 3/14/11 at 10:13

Moonglow1: some scientists believe that we are living in a video game: Albeit a badly written game. And, my goodness, the way our legislators act that could be true. Religion has always kept individuals ignorant. Public education grew with industrialization. After all, industry needs workers. However, with corporations becoming global and outsourcing jobs from the U.S. to other countries, it will be less important for Americans to be educated as we see from the "intelligence" of our elected officials. The people indeed got what they wanted. Dummies and cretins now represent the State of TN. And, your TAX DOLLARS are paying them to focus on Sharia Law and Birthing. I am starting a movement to be sure anyone holding public office in TN graduates from an accredited college (not an online school). I want to see their degree before they can be elected to high office. I want them to understand the rule of law and the Constitution of the United States of America, not the Constitution of Karl Rove, the Tea Party, and Fox News.

By: vebiltdervan on 3/14/11 at 10:27

budlight wrote: "I doubt if anyone blames God for a natural disaster..."

You haven't been paying attention to Pat Robertson, have you, budlight?

Seriously, let me address that one poster's semi-hysterical fears about illegal immigrants swarming all over Tennessee. This concept that there's an inexhaustible pool of illegal hispanics ready & waiting to overrun this nation is contradicted by the actual demographic trends. The birth rate in Mexico has plunged over the last 20 years from 6.2 to 2.4. The rate of illegal immigrants entering this country peaked several years ago, & will for the foreseeable future continue & accelerate its current decline.

Quit panicking, rightwingers! In five years' time, we will wonder what in the world people were so worried about, regarding this illusionary 'illegal immigrant' issue.

And mark my words, within 12-15 years, America will be forced to establish a guest worker program, to insure that an adequate supply of low-wage workers is lured to this country to keep our economy functioning. In particular, we will need to import hundreds of thousands of hispanic retirement home workers, because the majority of us Americans then will be old, retired, & infirm. Currently, ten percent of the population of Ecuador is in Spain, running their retirement homes for the most part. This will happen here: it's simple demographic reality.

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 10:31

The post, By: SargeE5 on 3/14/11 at 8:45, is signed "The Watchman". This guy sounds like one of those "Oath Keepers"....they are uniformed military and police, who pledge not to follow any "unconstitutional orders". They reserve the right of personal nullification....most are born again Christians.

Come clean, Sarge, are you an Oath Keeper?

By: frodo on 3/14/11 at 10:44

Okay, all you who think Jeffy's article passes as journalism...suppose I write a "news" article with the premise that Barack Hussein Obama is bent on bringing America to its knees. My source on this is Rush Limbaugh, The American Statesman, Fox News and a hack from The Heritage Foundation who teaches economics. No matter whether you agree with the premise or not...THAT IS NOT A NEWS STORY! Rather, it is the journalist's opinion that he tries to spin into a news story, because the boss won't let him on the opinion page.

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 10:56

The post, by Antisocialite, on 3/14/11, at 8:08, was poetic justice in prose; Spooky had alluded to Jeff Wood's incompetence as a writer, in his pedantic rant, Spooky committed two wrong-word errors of his own. False homophones bedeviled Spooky. My advice to Spooky is to not throw stones at us sinners.

By: bartsdad on 3/14/11 at 10:57

If they want to get paid for spouting religious rules and regulations....they should go work in a church.

By: BigPapa on 3/14/11 at 11:00

yes, they're squandering political capital and wasting time on off the wall social issues instead of reducing the size and scope of government. They need to get busy passing the Wine in Grocery Store Bill, that will at least make all this stupidity easier to take.

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 11:06

Sorry, Frodo, you presented a fanciful, but false analogy in your 11:44 post. Your conclusion is predicated upon that false analogy and its dubious premises.

The NCP is not Fox News, Jeff Woods presented statements from lawmakers, their critics and their supporters. That's more fair and balanced reporting than anything one is likely to encounter at Fox News on any given issue.

By: frodo on 3/14/11 at 11:13

...which tells me, Loner, that you don't really watch the news on Fox News...just a couple of the opinion-based shows. This article is not well-sourced. It is opinion journalism. It is just as logical to many of us that many of the issues the Republicans are dealing with ARE germane to our society and the laws of our state. You and others here want to see it differently. I happen to believe the Dems who ran the legislature for a century elevated a lot of issues I did not think belonged on the public agenda. But that is opinion. It isn't news.

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 11:43

The Tennessee theocrats, (the faith-based Republicans and Tea Party people), are reminiscent of the National Socialists in Germany between the Great Wars.

The Nazis were unable to solve the pressing economic issues of the day, so they scapegoated the Jewish People, the Gypsy (Roma) People, trade unions and homosexuals....and of course, the communists.

Today, the new scapegoats are the "illegals, Sharia-bearing Muslim Americans, corrupt trade unions, evolution teachers and homosexuals....same tactic, but with a modern Judeo-Christian re-write.

The National Socialists believed and the Judeo-Christian theocrats continue to believe in the efficacy of military solutions for geo-political problems.

The Nazis had Goebbels; the theocrats have Fox News.

The Germans had a War Lobby.....and we have one too.

Ten years in the "graveyard of empires", Afghanistan. is taking its toll.... and faith-based lawmakers are arguing about petty issues like teaching creationism in the public schools, the threat of Sharia Law in America and a so-called "homosexual agenda".

Will decent, educated people fall for the same old tactic today? It appears that far too many have.

Holy Wars Suck.

By: bartsdad on 3/14/11 at 11:55

Great analogy Loner

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 11:58

Sadly, Frodo, Fox News seems to be on the house TV in many public settings. It's on the TV sets in the various waiting rooms, it's on in the laundromats, it's on in the bars and in the dining areas in many restaurants, cafes and such.... it's even tuned in at the YMCA.

Fox News is also carried on all the clear channel radio stations within the range of my radio. Fox's phony "news" is ubiquitous. As a result, I have seen and heard enough to reasonably inform my opinion.

I also monitor the Christian radio and TV broadcasts; they are an echo chamber for Fox and the EIB network.

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 12:04

Thank you, Bartsdad.

I agree with you, "If they want to get paid for spouting religious rules and regulations....they should go work in a church." Well said.

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 12:08

In my 12:43 rant, I meant to enclose the word "illegals" in quotation marks...i missed the closing quotation mark key....mea culpa.

By: treehugger7 on 3/14/11 at 12:29

Loner, thank you for reminding me of Bob Dobbs!
There was a bar in Tucson named for him ( and espousing the principles) that I loved in the eighties. Where is he when we need him? And what would he think of the tea party?

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 12:50

My pleasure, treehugger7. You asked, "Where is he (Bob Dobbs) when we need him? And what would he think of the tea party?"

No man Knows the mind of Dobbs. All I know is that The Rupture could occur at this year's X-Days.

Me, I'll be at Brushwood, though the new official location for the event is at Wysteria, in Ohio.

I'm keepin' the faith at Brushwood, just in case the Mother Ship is still programmed for that traditional landing site. The faithful followers gathered at Brushwood may get to enjoy the last bit of human schadenfreude...... then the Rupture ends the madness, once and for all.

I've got my towel and I'll be riding first-class in the Mother Ship......praise Bob!

By: Loner on 3/14/11 at 12:56

Treehugger, you might enjoy Brushwood:

http://www.brushwood.com/

By: govskeptic on 3/14/11 at 2:25

So Mr. Wood along with the Democratic leadership has a better
idea for bills to be passed. There's an app for that. It's free and
it's called an election!

By: treehugger7 on 3/14/11 at 2:37

You were right, loner. I hate that I am not closer. Looks like a wonderful placewith like-minded people, and would suit me well!