House committee approves bill that could allow public schools to teach creationism

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 at 3:21pm

With lawmakers recalling Tennessee’s “Scopes Monkey Trial” of 1925, a state House committee on Tuesday approved legislation that critics say is aimed at opening public school science classes to the teaching of creationism.

“The monkey bill is back before us,” Rep. Jimmy Naifeh, D-Covington, said, warning it could embarrass Tennessee and hurt the state’s economy. “I’m just saying these things can be said and will be said about us. It may have some far-reaching effects that we don’t see at this time.”

The bill by Rep. Bill Dunn, R-Knoxville, cleared the House Education Committee on a voice vote. It requires public schools to “create an environment” in which teachers “respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about controversial issues,” including evolution and climate change. It also orders administrators to “assist teachers to find effective ways to present the science curriculum as it addresses scientific controversies.”

Dunn insists he aims only to promote “critical thinking” in schools about the origins of life. But opponents say the bill is clearly intended to open the door to teaching intelligent design in public schools, and creationists acknowledge they’re behind the proposal. Molly Miller, a Vanderbilt University geology professor, presented the committee with a letter of opposition to the bill signed by the professors in her school’s department.

Her testimony sparked an angry retort from one lawmaker after she seemed to liken creationism to “zombie theory." 

“The doors of science classrooms really do need to remain open to critiquing scientific concepts, as they are now in Tennessee,” Miller told the committee. “But they need to be closed tight to the evaluation of the supernatural, which is not science and that includes religious beliefs as well as a whole host of other things, like zombie theory. Note that by allowing religion into science classrooms, there could be all kinds of other things come along as well. Our students do not need to be spending their time on that when they are in science. They need to be able to learn science to compete.”

Rep. John DeBerry, D-Memphis, quickly grabbed his microphone and denounced “academics coming in here saying anybody who does not agree with them is some kind of idiot. I find it offensive.”

Miller said Tennessee could lose convention business because of the bill, but Rep. Joey Hensley, R-Hohenwald, called that “a pretty big stretch.” 

“There may be some other convention to replace those that don’t come here,” he said.

According to the ACLU, anti-evolution measures have failed this year in Kentucky, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Missouri. In Florida, legislation similar to Tennessee’s is advancing. Louisiana adopted a nearly identical bill into law in 2008.

House Democratic leader Craig Fitzhugh of Ripley said he doesn’t understand the controversy, suggesting that the teaching of evolution and Genesis each has its place in schools and churches. He recalled the 1960 movie about the “Scopes Monkey Trial” in which two famous lawyers — Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan — argued the case for and against a science teacher accused of breaking the Tennessee law against teaching evolution.

“I saw Inherit the Wind when Spencer Tracy held up the Origin of the Species and the Bible and looked at both of them and shoved them into his briefcase," Fitzhugh said. "It’s never been a problem for me. But I don’t think we ought to be creating controversies where they don’t exist. I question the need for this, and I do question what the purpose behind this is.”

92 Comments on this post:

By: HokeyPokey on 3/30/11 at 9:54

really? this is newsworthy? the people that complain about this should get a life, but i'm sure they just didn't want anyone to get offended by a law that historically represents the South. let's be sure and send 4 or 5 ACLU Lowers out to take it down before there's a lawsuit against TN.

By: Captain Nemo on 3/30/11 at 10:09

Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 9:52

Cap Nemo,

If you think the Tea Party is about controling your life you need to read up on what it stands for. I think you'll find just the opposite is true.
*******************************************************************************************

Sorry I have to go to work now, but how about this for starters Mulachi.

What the Republican Tea Party Stands for/their Platform:

1. Pro-Big Business (big business over working people).

2. Against meaningful government regulation and oversight of private industry.

3. Anti-Tax (yet they love war and want their trash picked up on time every week and they want the police to respond quickly when they call).

4. Anti-Federal Government

5. Prefer States rights over Federal authority (code for allowing States to do as they wish regarding voting rights, discrimination/basic civil rights, worker rights, etc).

6. Anti-Women's Rights

7. Anti-Labor Rights

8. In Favor of merging religion with government (They would love a Christian Theocracy)

9. In favor of a large military and large defense industry, although they claim they want small government. (not only are they crazy/unaware of facts... but they are also confused.)

10. Pro-war

11. In Favor of Tax cuts for the rich.

12. Xenophobic

13. Identify with Southern Politics - sympathetic to the old Confederacy and would like to see some form of it restored.

14. View non-whites as a threat to "the real America". This is one of their core beliefs and fears. It is at the heart of their existence and it is why they view anyone who is different with suspicion.

15. Supporters of big oil.

16. Against unemployment benefits for those who are struggling to survive. They believe that Americans who are struggling are annoying whiners.

17. Against healthcare for children and hope to rollback S-chip...or kill the program altogether.

18. Support insurance companies (over people).

19. Against Healthcare reform...and would like to reverse/repeal reform legislation.

20. Would like to eliminate or privatize Social Security. If they can't eliminate it, they would at least like to see some of the money gambled on Wall Street like Casino chips.

21. Believe Tax cuts can solve all economic problems.

22. Fiercely anti-Obama and have a general animus towards minorities.

23. Anti-Mexican

24. They flirt with racism and they openly associate with racists and extremists. They do little to condemn racist behavior or purge racist members from their ranks. They will only do so when they are caught/exposed by the media.

25. Against Comprehensive Immigration Reform

26. Have blocked bills in the Senate that would provide assistance for small business.

27. Against progress for the nation - against embracing and pursuing advances in science, energy, medicine, education, etc.

28. Supports a future of obstruction, political gridlock & national stagnation.

29. Generally not in favor of civil rights, basic Constitutional protections, etc.

30. Generally against the Department of Education and many would like to eliminate that department altogether, as well as the Department of Labor and other useful government departments, agencies & resources.

31. Against financial industry regulation.

32. They are not in favor of investing in the nations future and creating jobs at home.

33. Anti-collectivism is core belief.

34. Claim to be fiscally responsible and concerned about debt, yet when President Obama attempted to create a bi-partisan national debt commission with teeth... with the full support & power of Congress, to finally put together a serious plan to reign in the debt... the Republicans blocked the effort. The President had to work around the obstructionism with an executive order.

35. Have a strong dislike for the Judicial branch of government, and would like to seek ways to undermine the Courts.... (some of the ways they like to do this include - withholding or constraining the funding that the Federal courts need in order to function -essentially bullying & controlling one of the 3 branches of government, blocking judicial nominees, pushing legislation that challenges the decisions of judges and longstanding legal precedent, threatening/intimidating judges, and launching anti-court campaigns through their Republican media apparatus to create a negative perception of Federal judges and the role of the Court system in an attempt to influence -for political purposes- an American public that they know is open for that kind of PR/media manipulation).

36. Deep down inside... many Republican/Tea Party Conservatives do not believe that Blacks, Hispanics or other non-whites are real Americans.

37. They are opposed to the very existence of the UN and they would push to limit or eliminate the U.S. portion of its funding. They are also opposed to many forms of international cooperation and would likely curtail many of the positive things that the U.S. does around the world.

38. They would like to eliminate the few social safety net programs that Americans have (if they could get away with it) - social programs that many poor white Americans benefit from, such as food stamps.

By: Captain Nemo on 3/30/11 at 10:10

I call that control.

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 10:11

{By: Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 9:48
I don't want the gov't deciding what can and can't be taught in the schools. I want communities and educators making those decisions.}

Right, cause that NEVER causes problems! If there is one thing that will make our country stronger and superior it is inconsistent teaching of the populace.

By: PUBLK1813 on 3/30/11 at 10:28

A little research into Vanderbilt University's history (on their own website) reveals that Vandy was founded as a faith based institution, affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church. I'm pretty sure the founders of Vanderbilt believed (and correctly so) that we are here as a result of a infinitely wise Creator who loves us very much. But oh how Vandy has fallen. Now, just because we, in our relatively limitied capacity, cannot replicate the the process of creation in a lab, the truth of the matter is cast out. Talk about closemindedness. Vandy, pose the question to your medical doctors who perform a marvelous service each day by operating on the human body. If they are truly honest, they'll say there's no way all of this happened by chance! The fool has said in his heart, there is no God.

By: treefrogdk on 3/30/11 at 10:29

the silence from the right is deafening..... and golden
simplify

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 10:38

Glad you have a grasp of the real world there PUBLK1813. It seems that you should forward your ideas to our esteemed legislature to show them that they are actually reaching a person or two.

By: gdiafante on 3/30/11 at 10:58

Publk lists a good example for the case of evolution, in this case, Vandy's.

Why is it that if something is complex, it must automatically be God? To primitive man, a computer chip would seem too complex to have been man-made too...

Makes you think, huh?

By: Antisocialite on 3/30/11 at 11:04

Mulachi said:
Good science looks at all possibilities...

That's right Mulachi it does, and I've made an easily readable report card to show how science has judged several:

Four Humors Theory of Internal Medicine.................F

Spontaneous Generation Theory of Disease...........F

Stork Theory of Birth.......................................................F

Flat Earth Theory.............................................................F

Geocentric Theory of the Solar System......................F

Intelligent Design (Creationism).......................F

Mulachi also said:
And actually there are many scientists who believe Creationism is the only explaination for life. That's right ... scientists.

I'll concede the point, there are scientists who believe in Creationism... it's too bad for you that none of them are well-versed in the areas that would be needed for their opinions to have any weight whatsoever on this debate.

There are plenty of religious people who don't believe in Creationism as well, does that bolster my argument in your eyes?

By: pswindle on 3/30/11 at 11:10

My favorite GOP talking point is, "Let's take our country back." I wnat to say back from whom. This is another example of what TN has become. When the churches take over, this is what you get. The GOP guotes the "Constitution" well, it states that church and state are separate. But TN is hell-bent on putting the church in everything. The reason that it should be separate is that everyone has a different take on faith. Tennesseans are you proud of the GOP takeover and their ideas for the state? Of course the Gov. wants tort reform, he is a business man. When are we going to learn. That the GOP thinks of only what they can get and keep.

By: Community-carl-... on 3/30/11 at 11:46

i believe in respecting each individual's right to believe as he/sshe chooses.
Jesus taught love and tolerance.

But there is no denying that the United States was founded on Christian principles.
Historians will tell you that much of the the US Constitution is modeled/structured similarly to the Rules and Covenants of the Church of England. To this very day the National Cathedral houses an Episcopalian congregation with roots going back to the Church of England.

Certainly, there should be a separation of Church and State, but, in recent times, this effort has become perverted..........it seems like the only religious groups being disempowered are the mainline traditional Protestant Christan denominations.
Other vocal religious denominations are allowed to advocate their values and beliefs with very little restraint. This sad state thanks to the misguided ACLU.

Has anyone noticed that the US public schools suddenly deteriorated when prayer was no longer allowed? How about the soaring crime rate in general? With the absence of religious values come the absence of a conscience. I think we are rapidly becoming a nation of sociopaths.

How can God bless America when we have, for practical intents and purposes, kicked him out?

By: gdiafante on 3/30/11 at 11:56

"Has anyone noticed that the US public schools suddenly deteriorated when prayer was no longer allowed?"

How incredibly stupid.

By: gdiafante on 3/30/11 at 12:01

"How can God bless America when we have, for practical intents and purposes, kicked him out?"

Considering that America is the richest nation in the world and we have the greatest standard of living in history, I'd say we are blessed.

And if we kicked him out, it was in 1787 when the establishment clause forbid the government to establish a national religion.

If you think having your kid pray to God will make them smarter, then send 'em to a private school. It's not the taxpayers responsiblity to teach your kid religion.

By: house_of_pain on 3/30/11 at 12:27

"I reject your reality, and substitute my own."

By: Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 1:02

Cap Nemo -

I don't have the energy or time but I would love to take your list of Tea Party platforms and respond. I merely said they are not for "controlling" as you suggested, but just the opposite. About half of your list supports my claim as you have listed things that would take control away from the federal gov't ... thus proving my point.

As for your comment about the Tea Party loves war ... that just shows me yet again you don't understand the subject. Again, just the opposite is true and that fact couldn't be any clearer.

"Against process for the nation" ... seriously?

You claim they are against immigration reform in one point and yet later claim they are "anti-Mexican." Can both be true?

Again, you gave us a lot of bad information and if you want to pick just a couple to discuss I'd be more than happy to fill you in on the truth.

By: Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 1:05

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 10:11

{By: Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 9:48
I don't want the gov't deciding what can and can't be taught in the schools. I want communities and educators making those decisions.}

Right, cause that NEVER causes problems! If there is one thing that will make our country stronger and superior it is inconsistent teaching of the populace.

I'd rather some of the states get it right than the Federal Dept. of Education get it wrong for everyone. By the way, what's wrong with "inconsistent teaching"? Where has consistant gotten us?

By: Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 1:09

By: Antisocialite on 3/30/11 at 11:04

Mulachi said:
Good science looks at all possibilities...

That's right Mulachi it does, and I've made an easily readable report card to show how science has judged several:

Four Humors Theory of Internal Medicine.................F

Spontaneous Generation Theory of Disease...........F

Stork Theory of Birth.......................................................F

Flat Earth Theory.............................................................F

Geocentric Theory of the Solar System......................F

Intelligent Design (Creationism).......................F

Mulachi also said:
And actually there are many scientists who believe Creationism is the only explaination for life. That's right ... scientists.

I'll concede the point, there are scientists who believe in Creationism... it's too bad for you that none of them are well-versed in the areas that would be needed for their opinions to have any weight whatsoever on this debate.

There are plenty of religious people who don't believe in Creationism as well, does that bolster my argument in your eyes?

I didn't set out to argue with you. Unlike many on this post, I can't argue for something that isn't certain. My point is basically this;

Only a fool thinks he knows everything.

By: Community-carl-... on 3/30/11 at 1:10

gdiafante, before you go calling me stupid, you need to open your eyes.

America has been very blessed in the PAST.

Nowdays, it is a struggle for middle class citizens to stay afloat. Future generations are facing lesser life-syles than what they were born into. Crime and corruption are running rampant in the United States. Violence continues to increase. Politicians serve themselves rather than the people who elected them.
Formerly enslaved peoples are now unwilltingly enslaved to government entitlement programs that weaken and destroy their iniaitive, motivation, and personal productivity, thereby destroying their sense of self-worth and confidence.
And these entitlement programs are bankrupting the United States. Life as we know it is going to come to a grinding halt, as financial collapse and social choas finalize the ruination of our country.

I hope I am wrong, but I suspect the US is going the way of the Roman Empire if things don't change, and soon.

P.S. to gdiafante: You are entitled to your opinion that I am stupid.
I am entitled to my opinion that you are incredibly misguided.

By: Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 1:16

By: pswindle on 3/30/11 at 11:10

My favorite GOP talking point is, "Let's take our country back." I wnat to say back from whom. This is another example of what TN has become. When the churches take over, this is what you get. The GOP guotes the "Constitution" well, it states that church and state are separate. But TN is hell-bent on putting the church in everything. The reason that it should be separate is that everyone has a different take on faith. Tennesseans are you proud of the GOP takeover and their ideas for the state? Of course the Gov. wants tort reform, he is a business man. When are we going to learn. That the GOP thinks of only what they can get and keep.

There were many reasons why colonists came to the New World; a new life, economic speculation, indentured servitude, and the list goes on. But, one of the largest groups were those that were escaping the RELIGOUS PERSECUTION of the European Monarchs (cheifly the King of England). You see, everytime a new king came to power they "installed" their religion as the official religion of the country. People didn't like that, they didn't want to be, say, Catholic one year and Protestant the next. They came to the New World for the "freedom of religion" to practice their religion in their own way. Read the short quotation taken from the Library of Congress that discusses religion and government and insert your foot in your mouth at any time.

"It is no exaggeration to say that on Sundays in Washington during the administrations of Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809) and of James Madison (1809-1817) the state became the church. Within a year of his inauguration, Jefferson began attending church services in the House of Representatives. Madison followed Jefferson's example, although unlike Jefferson, who rode on horseback to church in the Capitol, Madison came in a coach and four. Worship services in the House--a practice that continued until after the Civil War--were acceptable to Jefferson because they were nondiscriminatory and voluntary. Preachers of every Protestant denomination appeared. (Catholic priests began officiating in 1826.) As early as January 1806 a female evangelist, Dorothy Ripley, delivered a camp meeting-style exhortation in the House to Jefferson, Vice President Aaron Burr, and a "crowded audience." Throughout his administration Jefferson permitted church services in executive branch buildings. The Gospel was also preached in the Supreme Court chambers."

Now how could the signers of the Constitution want a government free of all religion and then act in the manner set forth?

Sep. of church and state is not in the Constitution, fyi. It's purpose was only to prevent the Federal Gov't from establishing a "national religion." It does not mean the church can't be a major factor in policy. Freedom of religion means you are free to worship as you please ... it does not protect you from being exposed to the JudeoChristian beliefs and laws this country was founded upon.

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 1:22

{Sep. of church and state is not in the Constitution, fyi. It's purpose was only to prevent the Federal Gov't from establishing a "national religion." It does not mean the church can't be a major factor in policy. Freedom of religion means you are free to worship as you please ... it does not protect you from being exposed to the JudeoChristian beliefs and laws this country was founded upon.}

Fortunately for this country, the courts disagree with your analysis of the Constitution. And, even more so, the courts have more say than you do.

By: GUARDIAN on 3/30/11 at 1:45

GUARDIAN- Mulachi you can not explain truths to cockroaches and monkeys swinging by their tails in the trees. Understand that since you just moved here that liberal socialist progressive terrorist supporting cockroaches and monkeys don't spew their BS in public in Tennessee. They use their PC's to spread their lies around and call people names. BUT there are ex-democrats like myself who know how to call a spade a spade and do to them what they have done to those who disagree with them for years. Just tell the lowlifes the truths and laugh.

By: house_of_pain on 3/30/11 at 2:13

"Freedom of religion" must also include freedom from religion, otherwise we are not all truly, and equally, free.

By: gdiafante on 3/30/11 at 2:18

Carl...I didn't call you stupid...I said your statement was stupid.

And I stand by that assertion, unless you can provide evidence that school prayer (good luck being able to even show how many actually participated much less affected a child's ability to comprehend and learn) is the reason that public education is in the shape it is in.

I guess that this leaves parents, teachers, cirriculuum, class size, etc in the clear, huh?

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 2:41

GUARDIN - I would much rather be a cockroach than the POS you are.

By: gdiafante on 3/30/11 at 3:01

By GUARDIAN: "They use their PC's to spread their lies around and call people names."

Um...you just...by posting on a computer...and then...

Oh never mind.

By: Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 3:16

revo-lou,

Where do the courts disagree with me? For every court decision you site, I can site two. And since when do you put all your stock in what the courts say? They are human institutions ... able to be swayed and influenced by the flavor of the day just like public opinion. By saying "a court disagrees with you" you're saying "someone disagrees with you." I have no doubt, in a would full of the misled, that this will forever be true.

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 3:43

{Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 3:16

Where do the courts disagree with me? For every court decision you site, I can site two. And since when do you put all your stock in what the courts say? They are human institutions ... able to be swayed and influenced by the flavor of the day just like public opinion. By saying "a court disagrees with you" you're saying "someone disagrees with you." I have no doubt, in a would full of the misled, that this will forever be true.}

Yeah, let me know when you find a decision that says state sponsored religion is good to go. Let me know when you find a decision that says ones religious belief can be imposed on others at the states expense. Please, get those and enlighten us. As to “someone”, yeah, the courts are just someone applying their wishes and desires with no regard to the law or the Constitution.

By: rawhide09 on 3/30/11 at 4:00

Actually, the issue is whether anyone in public schools can DARE question (scientifically) secular beliefs of Global Warming alarmists and Evolutionists.

Theocracy? Give me a break . . .

By: Community-carl-... on 3/30/11 at 4:21

To gdiafante:

I'm a retired 60 year old educator who was based in a MNPS building for 20 years.
The points I was attempting to make were based on my numerous personal experiences.

I stand by my opinion that as the United States has become less and less a God respecting nation in the past several decades, it is no coincidence that crime, violence, political corruption, and poor student achievement, and lack of personal accountability have all escalated to the point that our beloved United States is spiraling toward a horrific doom.

I think anyone who is unable to make these observations for him/herself is either lacking in basic common sense, or in a state of denial, or both.

May God have mercy on us all.

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 4:28

{May God have mercy on us all.}

Now that is funny.

By: rawhide09 on 3/30/11 at 5:04

I'll tell you what's funny . . . that people like "revo-lou" can't see how much of a failure their worldview or ideology is. How much more money do you need for public schools to get them over the top "lou"? How much more wealth transfer in the form of "entitlement" spending do you need to win the war on poverty "lou"? How much longer before society starts to see fruit from all of your socialist and libertine policies "lou"?

You don't have much basis for mocking people who hold Judeo-Christian belief system.

By: Community-carl-... on 3/30/11 at 5:29

I feel sorry for "revo-lou." And I concur with "rawhide09."

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 5:40

Hmm, so, pro-religion is anti-society? Strange concept indeed. Rawhide and Carl of course have no concept of a real god/creator/superpower but instead cling to the Wonder Bread version of a god that they "believe" will be their savior and provide “it” all for them, if they just follow the “rules”. Fun to watch the utter bewilderment in their eyes when their “beliefs” turn to crap.

By: Community-carl-... on 3/30/11 at 10:13

Regarding "revo-lou" -

No one is as blind as he who WILL NOT see........

BTW - God helps those who help themselves.
**************************************************

One final word: Bitterness and hate corrode the vessel that contains it.

Peace and blessings wished for all. C.

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 10:32

Carl, it is quite clear that you and I will rarely see eye-to-eye, but you would do well to heed your own quote, because you are as blind as a bat to the real world.

BTW god DOESN'T need to help those that help themselves. But, he DOES need to help those in Japan, wonder what the delay is?

My final word is that ignorance, and in your case it may be stupidity, will "stunt your growth".

By: rawhide09 on 3/30/11 at 10:41

Actually revo-lou, you have demonstrated that you don't understand "my God" or my religious beliefs.

The irony is that you and yours (I assume that you support keeping any critical analysis of evolution out of schools--but of course your comments on the subject could very well be completely knee-jerk) choose to be blind to the obvious deficiencies in your junk science . . . all because you're afraid of the questions.

By: vladimpeler on 3/30/11 at 11:46

religion i one the truth is another, a question will not get an answer, when the question is superficial motivated for contradiction only, to show how smart we are, and the answer to the question will not be satisfactory to a mind not prepared with sufficient data to proces it, so for 90% unused brain, which put a question undfined and expect 100% satifactory answer, is like you want to get yourself in your e-mail without having one, by heart your caracter will give you the answer and you take the atitude YOU think is the right one, in reality you rush in conclusion to expose your caracter as non educated one, many many trees make flowers but not to many bear fruit, evolution or creation? i'm curious if anyone of you so a photon, which you tuch it every day.

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 11:55

{rawhide09 on 3/30/11 at 10:41

Actually revo-lou, you have demonstrated that you don't understand "my God" or my religious beliefs.

The irony is that you and yours (I assume that you support keeping any critical analysis of evolution out of schools--but of course your comments on the subject could very well be completely knee-jerk) choose to be blind to the obvious deficiencies in your junk science . . . all because you're afraid of the questions.}

You and your god are simpletons. Your lack of ability to understand the truth does not lesson the value of the truth. The only question that "scares" me is how so many people can be so afraid of the truth. But, in actuality, it is good that you and yours have a security blanket, as the world is just too busy to have to deal with any more nut cases.

By: revo-lou on 3/31/11 at 12:03

Damn, too late to be at this, s/h/b "LESSEN".

By: Mulachi on 3/31/11 at 9:24

By: revo-lou on 3/30/11 at 3:43

{Mulachi on 3/30/11 at 3:16

Where do the courts disagree with me? For every court decision you site, I can site two. And since when do you put all your stock in what the courts say? They are human institutions ... able to be swayed and influenced by the flavor of the day just like public opinion. By saying "a court disagrees with you" you're saying "someone disagrees with you." I have no doubt, in a would full of the misled, that this will forever be true.}

Yeah, let me know when you find a decision that says state sponsored religion is good to go. Let me know when you find a decision that says ones religious belief can be imposed on others at the states expense. Please, get those and enlighten us. As to “someone”, yeah, the courts are just someone applying their wishes and desires with no regard to the law or the Constitution.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No. You injected the courts into this debate, The burden of proof is upon you, not me. YOU put your foot in your mouth regarding the courts. So I will say again, for every one you site, I'll site two.

Just off the top of my head I remember a state court ruling the Ten Commandments could be displayed in its court house. There are plenty where that came from.

By: faithless forrest on 3/31/11 at 9:27

Faithless Forrest

The proponents of this creationism employ a deliberate misdirection.
They challenge evolution by talking about the origin of life. The origin of life is a separate issue. Evolution teaches us that we have common ancestors with the chimps, the cats, the snails, the algae and the Smallpox virus. Once the proponents of creationism say yes they understand that and help us clear up that misunderstanding, then and only then might we have honest discussion about abiogenisis. . They must first admit that Darwin was right.

Athiest, Agnostic, Don't believe in Jehovah?
Catch "FreeThought Forum" The Rationalists of East Tennessee and the Atheist Society of Knoxville host Freethought Forum on CTV on Tuesdays from 5:00 until 6:00 PM. CTV is available in Knox County, Tennessee, on Comcast Cable Channel 12 and Charter Channel 6. Live streaming is available on the CTV website, http://www.ctvknox.org/.

By: LizzyD on 3/31/11 at 4:07

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/evolution/intelligent-design-trial.html

Before y'all go spending a bunch of money of the state's money to defend your right to teach extremist fundamentalist Christianism in public schools, you might want to see the trial of the school board who tried it in Dover, Pa. This is both interesting and instructive.